A Makeover For Your Health

Independence

Too Cool for School

Too Cool for School

By on Nov 15, 2013 in Healthovers Blog, Independence, Learning |

In today’s heavily social (media) world, sometimes a “Too Cool for School” craze catches on. What’s “too cool for school?” You stop wanting to learn and experience life. Why? Because you’re already being told what’s “cool.” All of us are exposed to this phenomenon today over the internet, pads, phones, and myriad devices. It’s worth challenging the net-like peer pressure to keep learning and discovering for yourself. Nothing against nets. After all, spiders use nets to catch food…just not other spiders. It’s not easy to resist the pervasive culture. But your health and well-being benefits from wisely choosing how much you want to be involved. Too cool for school tells you what’s important to value. The more hits, the more news-worthy. The more likes, the more reliable. Is that how we really feel inside? That’s a question for each individual to ask for his or herself. When it comes down to it, tweets, likes, hits, and thumbs up will never compare to solo and individual experience. Taste something and decide for yourself how you feel about it. Even if a million people say it’s worth following, it’s okay to say you don’t dig it. In fact, you’d probably rather go for a walk, write a story, or do nothing at all. The point is, you’re not uncool just for having ignored it. Life is yours to live and learn through. Learning to filter all the stimulus available today to decide what’s valuable to you makes a difference. If you feel out of vogue, behind the times, not hip to it, or out of touch with the scene…maybe your mind and body are trying to tell you something? They’re probably reminding you that you are cool for school. It’s hip to be square.  ...

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If a Tree Falls and No One Hears It…?

If a Tree Falls and No One Hears It…?

By on Nov 15, 2013 in Everyday Health, Experience, Healthovers Blog, Independence |

The question goes, “If a tree falls and no one hears it, does it still make a sound?” I’ll shake this question up a bit and ask, “If you experience or see something, and no one else responds to it—did it still happen?” At one time or another, each of us faces a situation in which we strongly experience something that no one else responds to. Know the feeling? Without anyone else echoing what you saw or felt, you may wonder whether you imagined it all. Throughout life, it can be challenging to hold onto your true experience when you’re getting the message from others that it’s better or more convenient to dismiss it. You’re like the tree (without the falling part necessarily). The tree still falls even if no one is there to witness it happening. That’s what’s most important. In your own life when you go through something that’s important to you, it bears the same significance regardless of whether other people acknowledge it or not. It can feel frustrating to know your experience and then to doubt it because you feel alone there. The experiences you have that don’t fit a formula or can’t be categorized can feel like that the most. What’s most important, however, is that it really did happen—for you. The tree doesn’t care if anyone heard it fall or not. For humans, it’s more complex than that. Still, we can learn from the tree in keeping the integrity of our experiences even when there isn’t a witness to them. This week, take in those moments that no one else but you responds to. If you make a joke and no one else laughs, you can still enjoy the joke for yourself. If you see or hear something crazy and there’s zero reaction around you, remind yourself that the event still happened for you. If you see a hummingbird zip in front of your face, a lady bug appear on your clothing just when you need a little luck, or an unexplainable occurrence…it’s okay if no one else is there to see it or react to it but you. Sometimes the coolest moments are like that.  ...

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Only You Can Do It

Only You Can Do It

By on Sep 18, 2013 in Healthovers Blog, Independence, Inspire Health, Practice Health, Strength |

There are certain things in life that only you can do. Want to turn your health around? Only you can do it. Have a desire to reduce stress? It’s up to you. Have you been thinking about improving your sleep, losing weight, clearing up your skin, or eating healthier? Again, all signs point to you. While you may find resources out there to help you along the way, the first step to getting what you want in health or any other area is the realization: Only I can do this for myself. No one else can do it for me. Life can offer openings for you to get what you want, but until you take ownership of what you want, these openings may be hard to find. The temptation is often to seek answers outside of you. What book will help, which video has useful information, what did your friend say the other day that her doctor told her to do? Education is important when it comes to health, but the first steps toward getting healthy are often simple and within your control. These simplest measures can be the most difficult to start even though they are completely within your hands. We’re taught to seek solutions elsewhere and doubt our own instincts when it comes to self care and healthy living. Your body, however, offers the most powerful clues on what to do to take care of yourself. When you ask yourself what you’re uniquely aiming for, even when no one around you is on the same boat, you’re taking care of your health. When you turn to yourself during stressful times and support yourself through it, you’re clearer on how to get healthy. Only you can do it. No one else can. Taking accountability for what you want helps you to own it and to take real steps to get there—no matter what. When you frame your goals outside of yourself and look outward for the answers, the challenging times can feel stuck rather than opportunities to learn and grow. This mindset can lead to a cycle of disappointment and discouragement. Look at your health goals square on, and ask yourself what you can do. Don’t turn to...

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Be “The Best,” or Best at What You Do?

Be “The Best,” or Best at What You Do?

By on Jul 15, 2013 in Everyday Health, Facing Challenges, Healthovers Blog, Independence, Learning |

There comes a time when you’re cultivating a new skill, an art, a business, a talent, or just about anything where you’re standing at a distinct crossroads. One metaphoric road sign reads “Be the Very Best.” The cross street is marked with a sign that bears a resemblance to the first one, but represents something entirely different. That sign says “Be the Best at What You Do.” As you stand there, many conflicted feelings may flow through you. You start to wonder what “The Best” means to you. From a young age, we’re often generically taught to be the very best. Whether you’re learning to play the flute, dancing, playing a sport, going through grad school, or applying for a job (the list goes on), a repetitive message may knock at your brain cells. It says, “Not good enough—strive to be the best!” What was once enthusiasm for going for what you want can turn into confusion and discouragement. “What is the best,” you wonder, “and how can I possibly achieve a status that, by definition, seems reserved for one person?” In reality, the idea of the best always begs an answer of who out there is better than you and who is worse than you. Rather than a focus on your own unique skill and talent set, “the very best” implies that your inherent value is absent without this comparison. It stresses recognition rather than self-satisfaction, perfection over practice, an ideal rather than realistic expectations. It asks you to be things that you are not. The sign that reads “Be the Best at What You Do” is far more meaningful to who you are. What do you do? Naturally, you gravitate toward certain talents and ways of using these talents that are unique to you. When you work toward being the best at what you do, you can actually focus on what you’re really capable of. It doesn’t matter what the person sitting next to you or across from you is doing. They can’t possibly be the best at what you do, because they’re not you. And vice versa. While the message of being the best points everywhere else, the act of being the best at what you...

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When Safety Becomes Dangerous

When Safety Becomes Dangerous

By on Jul 13, 2013 in Existence, Facing Challenges, Healthovers Blog, Independence |

Safety is a natural instinct for all living creatures.  Mice tend to come out at night to search for food while many of their predators are sleeping.  Coyotes hunt in packs to take down large prey like elk and reduce their chances of being trampled to death.  A moth may have markings on its wings to make it look like a leaf.  And so on.  Safety is crucial for survival, and survival is a core goal for all life forms. Humans crave safety as well, but can what was originally an instinct for survival actually end up serving the opposite purpose?  Can our drive for increased security actually put us in increased danger, and make life more difficult rather than easier? The arguments on a larger, more societal scale are easier to examine, but also inevitably tend towards circular arguments such as, “if so-and-so is posing an increased threat to our national security, should we not bolster our defenses?”  This is hard to argue against, though clearly the current overall picture of the world’s health and safety does not leave us feeling so secure at all, with increasingly larger and more complex “defense” systems being developed at a rapid pace. But since the majority of us have little to no say in the overall state of affairs of our governments, instead let’s examine the concept of safety on an individual level, where power for change does exist. On a daily basis, you take certain precautions to reduce risk.  You wear your seatbelt (hopefully), you stop at red lights, you avoid eye contact with the scary looking tattooed guy talking to the voices in his head.  Common sense stuff, and common sense is a good thing. But are there safety measures in your life which not only prevent you from living to your fullest capacity, but actually put you in danger?  For humans, the illusion of safety often comes in the form of not standing out, of striving to belong, of not rejecting the status quo.  Children learn from a young age not to speak their minds, journalists find that the stories that need to be told are off limits, teachers are ordered to stay within the curriculum and not...

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Happy Independent You!

Happy Independent You!

By on Jul 5, 2013 in Existence, Facing Challenges, Healthovers Blog, Independence |

Every 4th of July, the air is filled with a lightness of being and an exciting buzz as we all get together to celebrate Independence Day. Signs of celebration surround almost every corner as we think of freedom, yet we are also reminded of the strength and courage that it takes to uphold freedom in the face of challenges that come along in life. We are joined by many others while watching fireworks, but the independence represented by this day is also felt on a very individual level. Each of us is unique, and each person manifests independence in a unique way. What does independence mean to you? Achieving the health that you want in life and shooting for your dreams involves independence on a very personal level. It takes asking yourself what is most important to you, knowing you will back yourself no matter what happens, and—remembering that you exist. Many things in life can tempt you to pull away from yourself, whether it be stress, work, social pressures, or just about anything. When this outside pressure presents, you know it and feel it on some level, but it takes honesty to face it. It can’t be underestimated, in the face of life pressures, the courage that it takes to uphold existence itself. What does it mean to exist? That isn’t a question someone else can answer for you. When times get tough, you can dig deep to find out what you’re really made of, and that is a loud gesture of how you exist. But even day to day, the act of upholding individual existence helps you face challenges that will inevitably arise on your unique path. On the level of health, remembering that your body exists and paying attention to it no matter what happens externally is a big part of preventive medicine. When you stay in tune with your body and pay attention to what it’s going through, you’ll be more than half way toward your optimal health! Each of us has a unique vibe, and this vibe can echo as strongly as the reverberation of fireworks. You just have to pay attention to it. What does your body say, what does your mind tell...

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