A Makeover For Your Health

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Too Cool for School

Too Cool for School

By on Nov 15, 2013 in Healthovers Blog, Independence, Learning |

In today’s heavily social (media) world, sometimes a “Too Cool for School” craze catches on. What’s “too cool for school?” You stop wanting to learn and experience life. Why? Because you’re already being told what’s “cool.” All of us are exposed to this phenomenon today over the internet, pads, phones, and myriad devices. It’s worth challenging the net-like peer pressure to keep learning and discovering for yourself. Nothing against nets. After all, spiders use nets to catch food…just not other spiders. It’s not easy to resist the pervasive culture. But your health and well-being benefits from wisely choosing how much you want to be involved. Too cool for school tells you what’s important to value. The more hits, the more news-worthy. The more likes, the more reliable. Is that how we really feel inside? That’s a question for each individual to ask for his or herself. When it comes down to it, tweets, likes, hits, and thumbs up will never compare to solo and individual experience. Taste something and decide for yourself how you feel about it. Even if a million people say it’s worth following, it’s okay to say you don’t dig it. In fact, you’d probably rather go for a walk, write a story, or do nothing at all. The point is, you’re not uncool just for having ignored it. Life is yours to live and learn through. Learning to filter all the stimulus available today to decide what’s valuable to you makes a difference. If you feel out of vogue, behind the times, not hip to it, or out of touch with the scene…maybe your mind and body are trying to tell you something? They’re probably reminding you that you are cool for school. It’s hip to be square.  ...

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Perfect:  The Enemy of Good

Perfect: The Enemy of Good

By on Oct 21, 2013 in Healthovers Blog, Learning, Mind-Body, Practice Health |

Why is perfect the enemy of good? Think about it. The message of “perfect” is that you’ll someday attain a status beyond which there’s no point of trying, or learning, or growing. If you’re perfect already, what’s the point of interacting with life and getting something out of it? “Perfect” tricks you into believing that there is a solution and an endpoint.  Do you think that any individual in the history of mankind created something unique by aiming for perfection? It seems to me that more innovative results came from casting perfection to the side in favor of creativity, autonomy, and doing the best you can. If you aim for perfection, you’re placing yourself in a sterile bubble by default. In a bubble of perfection, of course you can see the exact results you want to see in your health, social sphere, family, finances, and personal goals…by omission. You’ll have to omit all the stuff that’s not going perfect. What does this mean? You’ll have to omit a part of yourself in order to reach perfection. Human beings aren’t meant to strive for perfection, they’re meant to adapt. By adapting to the world around us and the unique events we’re each going through, we stay open to possibilities. Perfection doesn’t leave room for possibilities. Why? Because it’s too perfect. Next time you’re aiming for perfection, ask yourself what your mind, heart, and body are really rooting for. Are they seeking adventure? Are they seeking to break out of a bubble of certainty in order to taste what life is offering? Are they asking you to push yourself beyond previously held limitations to get to know yourself better and what you’re really made of? It doesn’t help to seek answers outside of yourself and from other people. Is it worthwhile to get down on yourself because a bunch of people who don’t even know you don’t believe you can reach your goals? Who knows you better than yourself? These are questions to ask yourself when the dazzle of perfection starts glittering stronger than your true desires. Perfect is the enemy of good. Remember that when you’re asking yourself to jump out of your skin to be something you’re not. Is the...

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The #*!*?! Keeps Coming

The #*!*?! Keeps Coming

By on Oct 21, 2013 in Facing Challenges, Healthovers Blog, Healthy Practices, Learning |

During life, most of us hold our breath and wait for a time that finally feels calm and accommodating to who we are. Do you know the feeling? We work, try, and grapple, hoping that times will change and things will get easier. After small periods of calm, we’re usually thrown back into the mix of stress and ups and downs. Just as you’re waiting to get off an emotional roller coaster, life often buys you a ticket for a new one. What’s that about? The truth is, the #*!*?! keeps coming. The illusion that if you wait long enough or try hard enough, that all the messiness and frustrations of life will stop is just that–an illusion. So what do you do? A big part of living in and staying healthy in reality is coming to terms with the #*!*?! Keeps Coming phenomenon. None of us have a human-desired control over life. We live in a world that is wild no matter how we try and contain it. When you live in the wild, you have to prepare. You prepare first and foremost by taking care of yourself. With the knowledge that storms, lightning, and droughts may be around the corner, you still have to keep up with physical and mental-emotional fitness as much as you can. Preparation helps you to get through new and stressful periods of time that you may not have foreseen (since we don’t have crystal balls at our disposal). You can also make more peace with the fact that #*!*?! Keeps Coming. Have you wanted it to be different? If so, in what ways? Ask yourself if the positive changes you’re hoping for live in fantasy land or in reality. Reality tends to repeatedly present challenges with a common theme if we’re ignoring the bigger picture. Unless we face the challenge head on here and now, we’ll often be met with it again. Finally, it’s okay to step back and not try so hard all the time. Trying your best is admirable. However, some forms of trying resemble banging against a wall over and over again. No matter how hard you try, the wall is still there and you can’t imagine it away. Try...

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Health and Your Inner Teacher

Health and Your Inner Teacher

By on Aug 26, 2013 in Facing Challenges, Healthovers Blog, Learning, Mind-Body, Practice Health |

When you travel the halls of your memory, who do you remember as your most influential teachers? How did these teachers influence your life and change it for the better? Great teachers spark more than math, literature, or science in your life. They spark something else as well, something deeper and long-lasting that stays with you. As an individual living your life, you have another teacher you may not have touched on in your memory. That teacher is you! When you’re trying to get healthy and support your body and mind better, your inner teacher is key toward achieving what you want. Health involves learning. You learn about your body and which lifestyle habits foster balanced health, versus which habits derail health. But you also learn something else. You learn about yourself as a person, how you face challenges, and which obstacles are blocking your road to health. The journey toward health involves more than regimens for diet, exercise, and sleep. The journey is unique to who you are and where you’re at in life too. Bringing out your inner teacher to learn about your health isn’t always easy. Everyone wants to believe they are perfectly healthy, and sometimes facing the reality that your health needs more support can be challenging. It means admitting that you’re not perfect and that you still have more to learn. It takes knowing that supplements, medications, or doctor’s visits alone can’t keep you healthy. You as a person are an essential part of your health, and acknowledging this fact takes honesty and courage. When you call forth your inner teacher in an open and honest way, you can explore your physical and mental-emotional health through a unique lens. You can ask yourself if there are societal and personal expectations that are burdening you and blocking your health. You can explore whether some part of your past unfairly has a hold on your health and who you are today. You can explore your relationships with yourself and other people to see whether they are supporting or hindering health. You can also notice how you manage stress and emotions and whether your current approach could use some adjustment for better health. Good teachers both challenge...

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Catching Currents in Health and Life

Catching Currents in Health and Life

By on Jul 22, 2013 in Everyday Health, Facing Challenges, Healthovers Blog, Learning |

Have you ever watched while a bird catches a current of wind to get where it wants to go? In one swift movement, the bird’s wings can glide from one current to the next, just by naturally following the direction of the wind. The bird will swoop to the left and then way over to the right, without the changes in speed or direction looking forced or unnatural. Even while we as humans do not have wings, we can still catch the metaphoric wind currents in our own lives to help us get where we want to go. Human nature, especially in the form of stuck thoughts, tends to dictate that change needs to be forced and that we have to make it happen. A gung-ho attitude in life is not a bad thing. However, there are places in each of our lives where we can afford to take a step back from deliberate or forceful measures in order to catch an existing current of flow and movement that is already in place. Can you think of situations in your life lately where you have felt stuck trying, waiting, struggling, suffering, banging your head, and begging life to do what you’re asking it to do? You may not feel like you’re taking flight in this area. Take a deep breath, Take a step back in your mind, and Imagine yourself flying like a bird. Your wings have felt locked in place with one fixed idea or thought pattern. Now that you’re free of that, you’re rising, gliding, and dancing on currents of air that you can’t exactly see—but you can feel. Do you feel the buoyancy, as you imagine this scenario? When you want to go left, the wind supports your flight there. When you want to change direction, your wings find nearby currents to help your flight. When you want to hover for a short time in one spot, you can rest there until a new current comes along that you feel like catching. You are still flying on your own, but the existing currents are helping you take the path of least resistance where possible. It’s okay to catch currents once in a while to get where...

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Be “The Best,” or Best at What You Do?

Be “The Best,” or Best at What You Do?

By on Jul 15, 2013 in Everyday Health, Facing Challenges, Healthovers Blog, Independence, Learning |

There comes a time when you’re cultivating a new skill, an art, a business, a talent, or just about anything where you’re standing at a distinct crossroads. One metaphoric road sign reads “Be the Very Best.” The cross street is marked with a sign that bears a resemblance to the first one, but represents something entirely different. That sign says “Be the Best at What You Do.” As you stand there, many conflicted feelings may flow through you. You start to wonder what “The Best” means to you. From a young age, we’re often generically taught to be the very best. Whether you’re learning to play the flute, dancing, playing a sport, going through grad school, or applying for a job (the list goes on), a repetitive message may knock at your brain cells. It says, “Not good enough—strive to be the best!” What was once enthusiasm for going for what you want can turn into confusion and discouragement. “What is the best,” you wonder, “and how can I possibly achieve a status that, by definition, seems reserved for one person?” In reality, the idea of the best always begs an answer of who out there is better than you and who is worse than you. Rather than a focus on your own unique skill and talent set, “the very best” implies that your inherent value is absent without this comparison. It stresses recognition rather than self-satisfaction, perfection over practice, an ideal rather than realistic expectations. It asks you to be things that you are not. The sign that reads “Be the Best at What You Do” is far more meaningful to who you are. What do you do? Naturally, you gravitate toward certain talents and ways of using these talents that are unique to you. When you work toward being the best at what you do, you can actually focus on what you’re really capable of. It doesn’t matter what the person sitting next to you or across from you is doing. They can’t possibly be the best at what you do, because they’re not you. And vice versa. While the message of being the best points everywhere else, the act of being the best at what you...

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